IBM MeAns Service Button with 13 stripe logo - a true ThirteenStriper 

January 4, 1949 Thomas J. Watson, Jr. published in the New York Daily Mirror a now celebrated ad "IBM Means Service".
More information about the "IBM Means Service ad can be found in the IBM Archives

When I first became aware of Manfred's collection and great knowledge on the subject, I asked him to keep an eye out for an IBM pin featuring the Thirteen Strip logo. He assured me that in all of his years of collecting IBM pins he had never noticed a 13 stripe logo. As it turns out he did in fact find an example printed on a button in his junk box. Even though it was a button not a pin and mother earth had begun to reclaim it from the inside out, I was elated!

This set of pictures not only documents this buttons current condition but also includes a digital restoration or what might be considered a Glamour shot in some gallerys.

Glamor Photo of an IBM MeAns Service Pin - after digital restoration -  or, how I see this and most likely will always remember this fine example :)
Glamor Photo of an IBM MeAns Service Pin - after digital restoration - or, how I see this and most likely will always remember this fine example :)

This was the First Scan I received from Manfred within minutes of his finding it in a box of junk pins and buttons.
This was the First Scan I received from Manfred within minutes of his finding it in a box of junk pins and buttons.

Closeup the IBM thirteen stripe logo - Yes a true Thirteenstriper !
The 13 stripe logo first appeared on the masthead of at least one System 360/TSS and documents related to virtual memory and the time share operating system that became the heart of the System 370.
It was quickly replaced by the official eight strip logo due to its poor overall contrast. For this and other printing concerns IBM continued to use the pointy M block letter logo until the early 70's when use of the official eight stripe logo became mandated.
Closeup the IBM thirteen stripe logo - Yes a true Thirteenstriper !
The 13 stripe logo first appeared on the masthead of at least one System 360/TSS and documents related to virtual memory and the time share operating system that became the heart of the System 370.
It was quickly replaced by the official eight strip logo due to its poor overall contrast. For this and other printing concerns IBM continued to use the pointy M block letter logo until the early 70's when use of the official eight stripe logo became mandated.

Later reprint of the original IBM Means Service Ad showing early CE on a bike.

I include it here to help clarify some of the meaning behind this button and shed a little light on the background behind the creation of this thirteen stripe logoed button.

The IBM logo on the cart has a flat bottom M indicating a period in time before 1954 when Paul Rand changed the  shape of the M and made a point to register it as The IBM trademark that way.
Later reprint of the original IBM Means Service Ad showing early CE on a bike.


I include it here to help clarify some of the meaning behind this button and shed a little light on the background behind the creation of this thirteen stripe logoed button.


The IBM logo on the cart has a flat bottom M indicating a period in time before 1954 when Paul Rand changed the shape of the M and made a point to register it as The IBM trademark that way.


A 60x inspection indicates a contamination between the protective outer plastic cover and the printed material on the inside. This contamination had to have been introduced when it was assembled.
A 60x inspection indicates a contamination between the protective outer plastic cover and the printed material on the inside. This contamination had to have been introduced when it was assembled.

At 60x under the microscope there can clearly be seen a hair on the top of the A under the plastic.
At 60x under the microscope there can clearly be seen a hair on the top of the A under the plastic.

At 300x the hair on the top of the A looks like it may still have some trace DNA. 

Lets find out who messed up this button .... Ok, I admit I watch too much TV ... a usb microscope does makes a great toy :)
At 300x the hair on the top of the A looks like it may still have some trace DNA.


Lets find out who messed up this button .... Ok, I admit I watch too much TV ... a usb microscope does makes a great toy :)

As you can see it is a very unremarkable back with no signs of rust. This button looks to have been stored well, the primary damage is due to workmanship during construction.
As you can see it is a very unremarkable back with no signs of rust. This button looks to have been stored well, the primary damage is due to workmanship during construction.

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